NASA Essentials

Collection Header_Essentials_Mobile4
Meatball Tee_1

The Meatball

Years Active: 1959–1975, 1992–present
Designer: James Modarelli

  • Next Level 6010: Premium Heather
  • 50% Polyester / 25% Cotton / 25% Rayon
  • 3 Color Screen Print
  • Print Size 9″ wide
  • Water based ink
  • Colors White, Red 186c, Blue 285c
Clear
Meatbal Sweat__1

The Meatball Sweatshirt

  • Bella Canvas 3901: Grey Triblend
  • 52% Airlume combed and ring-spun cotton, 48% polyester
  • Side-seamed. Unisex sizing. Crew neck. Ribbed cuffs and waistband. Tear-away label.
  • Raglan sleeves
  • 3 Color Screen Print
  • Colors White, Red 186c, Blue 285c
Clear
Meatball Example Image2

The round red, white and blue insignia, nicknamed the "meatball," was designed by employee James Modarelli in 1959, NASA's second year. The design incorporates references to different aspects of the mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The round shape of the insignia represents a planet. The stars represent space. The red v-shaped wing represents aeronautics. The circular orbit around the agency's name represents space travel.

After it was introduced, the "meatball" was the most common symbol of NASA for 16 years, but in 1975 NASA decided to create a more "modern" logo. That logo, which consisted of the word "NASA" in a unique type style, was nicknamed the "worm." That logo was retired in 1992, and the classic meatball insignia has been the most common agency symbol since.

Source
the Worm_1

The Worm

Years Active: 1975–1992, re-instated as a secondary logo in 2020
Designer: Richard Danne & Bruce Blackburn

  • Next Level 3600: White
  • 100% Cotton
  • 1 Color Screen Print
  • Print Size 10" wide
  • Standard ink
  • Colors: Red 2347c
Clear
Worm Sweatshirt_1

The Worm Sweatshirt

  • Bella Canvas 3901: Ash
  • 60% Airlume combed and ring-spun cotton, 40% polyester
  • Side-seamed. Unisex sizing. Crew neck. Ribbed cuffs and waistband. Tear-away label.
  • Raglan sleeves
  • 1 Color Screen Print
  • Colors: Red 2347c
Clear
The Worm example

Enter a cleaner, sleeker design born of the Federal Design Improvement Program and officially introduced in 1975. It featured a simple, red unique type style of the word NASA. The world knew it as “the worm.” Created by the firm of Danne & Blackburn, the logo was honored in 1984 by President Reagan for its simplistic, yet innovative design.

NASA was able to thrive with multiple graphic designs. There was a place for both the meatball and the worm. However, in 1992, the 1970s brand was retired - except on clothing and other souvenir items - in favor of the original late 1950s graphic.

Until today.

The worm is back. And just in time to mark the return of human spaceflight on American rockets from American soil.

Source
NASA seal_1

The NASA Seal

In addition to the insignia, NASA has another official symbol. If the meatball is the everyday face of NASA, the NASA seal is the dressed-up version. The NASA administrator uses the seal for formal purposes such as award presentations and ceremonies. Like the meatball insignia, the seal also includes planet, stars, orbit and vector elements.

  • Next Level 3600: White
  • 100% Cotton
  • Digital Print Tee
Clear
Project mercury seal Tee_1

Project Mercury Emblem

  • Next Level 3600: White
  • 100% Cotton
  • Digital Print Tee
Clear
Mercury astronauts

Project Mercury was the NASA program that put the first American astronauts in space. Astronauts made a total of six spaceflights during Project Mercury. Two of those flights reached space and came right back down. These are called suborbital flights. The other four went into orbit and circled Earth. The first of those six flights was made in 1961. The last flight was made in 1963.

NASA selected seven astronauts for Project Mercury in 1959. Choosing the astronauts was one of the first things NASA did. The agency was only six months old when it chose them.

Alan Shepard made the first Mercury flight. That flight made him the first American in space. The 15-minute flight went into space and came back down. His Mercury capsule was named Freedom 7. Years later, Shepard walked on the moon as commander of the Apollo 14 mission.

Source
Apollo program Seal_1

Apollo Emblem

  • Next Level 3600: Navy
  • 100% Cotton
  • Digital Print Tee
Clear
Apollo 11_1

Apollo 11 Emblem

  • Next Level 3600: Black
  • 100% Cotton
  • Digital Print Tee
Clear
Moon Landing

"That's one small step for a man. One giant leap for mankind."
Neil Armstrong

The national effort that enabled Astronaut Neil Armstrong to speak those words as he stepped onto the lunar surface fulfilled a dream as old as humanity. Project Apollo's goals went beyond landing Americans on the moon and returning them safely to Earth. They included:

  • Establishing the technology to meet other national interests in space.
  • Achieving preeminence in space for the United States.
  • Carrying out a program of scientific exploration of the Moon.
  • Developing human capability to work in the lunar environment.
Source